2020, Camp Gladiator, Discipline, Exercise, Family and triathlon, Goals, Intentional, Leadership, Success, Too early!, Triathlon, Wisdom, Work

Still true!

A while ago I wrote this article after thinking about how personal exercise and professional work are tightly tied together. I revisited it and it’s still true – REALLY true! I’m not working towards triathlon finish lines right now, but I am committed to Camp Gladiator and loving how it’s affecting me. These bullets are true about intentional exercise and what it does to your outlook. I made a few updates to reflect my CG experience, but otherwise it’s exactly the same message.

*****

Here are my personal reasons for why you should hire an athlete! Granted, I’m a little biased. I realize that, and I’m OK with that. Read on & see what you think…

  • Goal setting. Goal setting is natural for athletes. Whether it’s a run or any type of athletic event there’s always a goal in mind, even if it’s just to finish the event. Being able to see something big, even just in concept, and committing to it is part of being an endurance athlete. Sometimes the goal is just to make it to that early session to see the beautiful pink sunrise.
  • Being OK with being messy. Life is messy, and exercising is *very* messy. Hard work usually requires sweat – maybe literal, maybe not, but athletes understand that working hard and sweat are tied together.
  • Understanding consequences. One of the unintended consequences of signing up for events such as triathlons is the huge (did I say huuuuuge) amount of laundry! You have to be willing to have both, and there are many parallels in life & work. Creating things can be messy and can have unintended consequences – some great and some not as great.
  • Setbacks. Anyone who has any athletic experience can understand the power of a setback. Race day can take a sharp turn quickly. Being able to adjust for factors that are out of your hand – like weather, pot holes, choppy water – is a great skill that’s developed over time and with athletic performance. Some days you may not be able to give 100%, but you can give what you can.
  • Endurance. Long term planning at work requires the ability to pace yourself, especially through a complex project or one with multiple people/layers. Employers want people who are able to endure and be persistent over time. You also have to acknowledge that time & energy are limited – your capacity depends on many layers. Don’t over promise & under deliver.
  • Planning. Planning is different than goal setting. Seeing something in the distance is one thing; being able to plan backwards from that goal with smaller steps and milestones along the way is a concept that resonates very well with athletes who enjoy triathlon or other long distance sports.
  • Tools. Having good equipment (tools) makes a really big difference in performance. Being able to quantify your distance, pace…having solid running shoes…a good timing sports watch… a good support system in place…goggles that don’t leak…all those things make a huge difference. Having a great water bottle, sturdy mat, or weights that fit your hands are important. It’s best to invest in good quality rather than cut corners and suffer long term injuries. That’s true about people, technology, and just about everything!
  • Commitment. Sticking to a goal is a great skill and ability to have. It’s one thing to say you’re going to do a big event in 10 months. It’s quite another to consistently get long bike rides in, wake up at 5am, and swim miles every week over a period of time. Sacrifice & commitment are tied together in working for something that’s important.

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